Caregiver Resume Help and Example

Are you wondering how to create an effective caregiver resume? Although the specific information and layout may vary, here is a general idea on what to do.

Every resume should have general information such as your full name, your full address, and phone number including the area code. An e-mail address is optional. Just be sure that if you do include your e-mail, check it every day to make sure if you are contacted, that you reply as soon as possible.

Objective  Education  Work  Volunteer  References  Other  Example

Click here to download and print an example resume (pdf) - To create your own, simply copy and paste the text in an editing program such as Microsoft word.

Objective

You should think of a proper objective to type at the top of your caregiver resume. It should be informative but short, preferably no longer than one sentence. It should convince the employer that you have an overall goal. If your goal is to just get the job you are applying for, say so. If your end goal consists of something else later on, state what that goal is and how the job will help you achieve it.

Education

Next, you should list the education you have received. If you graduated high school or received a GED, list where you received it and when. You could also list your GPA or some courses you took that would benefit you as a caregiver.

If you have gone or are currently going to college, you should list that as well. Tell where you are going, what you are majoring in, and your current GPA. If it is a position in the medical field, then that would convince the employer even further that you need experience as a caregiver.

You should also write if you have any certificates that would benefit you on the job such as a CPR license. One that I received before I became a registered nurse (RN), and one that I believe every caregiver should get at some point, is a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) license. Many jobs even require you to have this prior to being hired. It will teach you all of the basic caregiver duties necessary for a caregiver job.

Work Experience

You should list all of your work experience on your caregiver resume as well. You should not only write where and when you worked but also what your work consisted of. List what position you were in and the skills that were required. If you received an award such as employee of the month, it would be beneficial to list that as well.

I wouldn't write if you were paid directly from an individual or in other words, "under the table". Not only does it make your work experience sound unprofessional, it is also technically illegal. Save that information for your volunteer experience section.

Volunteer Experience

For a caregiver resume, listing volunteer experience is a big plus. It shows that you are willing to help others with or without pay. It shows that you don't just do things if it pays to do so, but because you like working and helping others. That kind of attitude is what the medical field needs.

Just like your work experience section, make sure you write not only when and where you volunteered, but what you did as well. Volunteer work can be a community event you participated in, assisting patients at a long-term care facility, or something as simple as cleaning your grandmother's house while she was sick.

References

Some people consider this section optional, but it is very valuable. Your references should be people who see you as a great fit for the job you are attempting to obtain. This could be friends, employees or employers from a previous job, or even family. Just be careful. I wouldn't recommend listing immediate family because of course your mother or father would automatically praise you and employers know that.

Aim to have at least three references. Make sure you write down your relation with this person, what they do, as well as their phone number. I would not recommend writing down their e-mail address unless you are absolutely certain they check it at least once daily.

It is nice to let your references know in advance that they may be getting a call concerning you. Some people don't answer their calls if they see a number they don't recognize. They may even get confused as to who the call is concerning especially if the caller only tells them your first or last name.

In the past, I have written on the bottom of my resume's "References available upon request." I would then print them out separately. My main reasoning behind this is because I wanted all of my information to fit on one page.

Other Tips

Never let your caregiver resume take up multiple pages. Not only does this look very unprofessional, one of the pages may get lost or forgotten. It is better to shorten the amount of text on your resume, or shrink the font size altogether. You could also slightly shorten the margins, but keep at least one inch on either side.

Make sure the text is easily readable. I would recommend the text to be in the Arial or Times New Roman font style. Don't shrink the text anymore than 10 points. Always make the text black with an all white background. Do not try to be fancy or unique. This will not make your resume stand out in the crowd, at least not in a good way. It should look as clean and professional as possible.

Have a reliable friend or family member read over your caregiver resume to make sure it looks neat and free of errors. Have them read it from an employer's perspective. If they notice any areas of improvement, consider their suggestions.

Example Resume


Type your full name

[Type your phone number]

[Type your e-mail]

[Type your address]

Objective

[Type your objective]

Education

[Type your school name]

[Type the completion date] | [Type the degree]

·      [Type list of accomplishments]

Work Experience

[Type your job title] | [Type the start date] – [Type the end date]

 [Type the company address]

[Type job responsibilities]

Volunteer Experience

·      [Type list of experience]

References

 [Type person’s name]

[Type your relation to this person]

[Type their occupation]

[Type their phone number]


Caregiver Employment Tips and Resources

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